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The Sculpture Program at the New York Studio School invites students to engage with the potent language of tangible materials. To generate purpose for this language, we experience and reconsider: mass, space, material, form, process, touch, image, color, structure, organization, balance, rhythm, movement, context, and relationship.

Our rigorous program, taught by a small group of dedicated professional sculptors, provides an opportunity to bring together process, perception, research, and critical dialogue. Each student gains a conviction for sculpture and a foundation from which his or her work can evolve throughout a lifetime.

Afternoon Sculpture courses allow participants to study and create alongside our MFA and Certificate candidates. During the Fall semester of 2019, Jilaine Jones will lead a course on Tuesday afternoons from 2pm – 6pm and Leonid Lerman will lead a course on Thursday afternoons from 2pm – 6pm.

ENROLL

Sculpture: Structure and the Body – with Jilaine Jones

Tuesdays, 2pm – 6pm
February 4th – May 5th, 2020
No Class: Tuesday, March 31st – Spring Break

Cost: $925

Course Description

Working experimentally with a range of materials, participants in this course will make structures in response to a model interacting with a spatial set-up. Sculptural work will be generated from perception, physical empathy, intuition, and imagination. Our discussion will be oriented around how the source, a body’s position in a setting, becomes a new structure. How that becomes idea for the participant will be explored through the behaviors of a range of materials, including clay, wire, wood, cardboard, mixed and found materials. The model’s positions and setting will change over the semester and will also be of an experimental nature. We will not be engaged with concerns of correctness for figure representation but rather will use this source for its containment of experience and structural dynamics. This course comes to working with the body through the perspective of 20th century’s sculptural awareness: which to a great extent have not included the figurative canon.

Course Outline

Beginning with the things made, as most important, and the student’s implicit and imaginative understanding of the body, works will be produced for the first few weeks without a model present. We will use these first works to initiate dialogue about what and how we are seeing. The model will then be positioned in the context to support exercises parsing out qualities: including – the dualism of areas of the body both in form and mechanics, the whole vs the parts, the inside being the outside, the force and form of movement, gravity and interconnection with context. Methods of using the materials clay, wire, wood, paper, cloth, plaster will be used in conjunction with the concepts of the exercises. Ultimately participants will choose to develop an idea about the body in context through a process and material which has grown through their work independently in the course. Viewing and discussion of related precedents will be integrated throughout the course as well as a group viewing and discussion at a gallery or museum exhibition(s).

Course Syllabus

ENROLL

Sculpture: the Body and its Language – with Leonid Lerman

Thursdays, 2pm – 6pm
September 19 – December 12, 2019
No Class: Thursday, October 10 and November 28, 2019

Cost: $925

Course Description

This course will focus on making use of the figure and is aimed to help students understand the structure of the human figure through direct observation and conversion of perceptual information into a “language of sculpture.” The goal is to cultivate the skills of a young artist in order to create an “image,” based on “timeless confrontation with a present moment.” (–T. McEvilley).

Course Outline

During the course of a semester, class will work on several projects focused around the perceptual work from the figure:
– Sketches in clay with focus on movement, balance, proportions, 8-12”;
– Portrait. Bust from life with complex relation of head to shoulder, life size;
– Basic principles of relief sculpture. Portrait in relief;
– Half-life size figure modeling with focus on gesture, proportions, balance, sense of rhythm and connection between different parts of the body, 24-36”;
– 3-D composition: interpretation of a classical sculpture or painting of the past. Spatial relations in abstract and semiabstract terms (optional).
– Final discussion: the importance of the Modernist critique of traditional conventions for present-day artists interested in working with the human figure.

Course Syllabus

ENROLL

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